Donald Trump and Theresa May to use NATO summit to press EU leaders to spend more on defence

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Read: 261     16:13     10 July 2018    

Theresa May will join Donald Trump in demanding EU leaders stump up more cash for NATO on Wednesday.


The Prime Minister and President jet into Brussels for a crunch summit at the alliance’s new $1billion headquarters, where Mr Trump is expected to call on other nations to pump more money into their Armed Forces.

He previously branded the alliance “obsolete” and has hit out at countries failing to meet the NATO minimum benchmark of spending 2% of their national income on the military.

The US Ambassador to NATO, Kay Bailey Hutchison, told the BBC: “What he has said, as everyone knows, is that European allies should pay more of their fair share of the burden.”

Experts fear Mr Trump, who has repeatedly demanded more funds from other nations, could plunge the alliance into the worst crisis of its 69-year history this week.

Just six of its 29 members, including Britain, meet the commitment to spend at least 2% on defence.

The US pumped in 3.57% in 2017 and is by far the biggest contributor.

But Ms Bailey Hutchison said the President “wants to encourage and push them” to meet the target.

Calling for a recommitment to the 2% pledge, she added: “They admit that they should be able to do it and work towards it.

“The President is trying to encourage the allies to do more because the 2% is not just something that came out of the air.

“It’s what was agreed was necessary for the full capabilities of our alliance to deter and defend against any adversary – and we have some pretty powerful adversaries right now.”

In a joint declaration with NATO yesterday, the EU said it would make efforts to “strengthen NATO, and thus will improve our common security”.

It added: “For NATO allies, such efforts foster an equitable sharing of the burden, benefits and responsibilities, in full accordance with their commitment undertaken in the Defence Investment Pledge.”

The pledge, signed in 2014 at the Wales summit, called for allies which failed to meet the benchmark to stop cuts to their defence budgets, gradually raise spending, and move towards the 2% threshold within a decade.

Mirror.co.uk



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News Line

Donald Trump and Theresa May to use NATO summit to press EU leaders to spend more on defence

2018/07/1531223019.jpg
Read: 262     16:13     10 July 2018    

Theresa May will join Donald Trump in demanding EU leaders stump up more cash for NATO on Wednesday.


The Prime Minister and President jet into Brussels for a crunch summit at the alliance’s new $1billion headquarters, where Mr Trump is expected to call on other nations to pump more money into their Armed Forces.

He previously branded the alliance “obsolete” and has hit out at countries failing to meet the NATO minimum benchmark of spending 2% of their national income on the military.

The US Ambassador to NATO, Kay Bailey Hutchison, told the BBC: “What he has said, as everyone knows, is that European allies should pay more of their fair share of the burden.”

Experts fear Mr Trump, who has repeatedly demanded more funds from other nations, could plunge the alliance into the worst crisis of its 69-year history this week.

Just six of its 29 members, including Britain, meet the commitment to spend at least 2% on defence.

The US pumped in 3.57% in 2017 and is by far the biggest contributor.

But Ms Bailey Hutchison said the President “wants to encourage and push them” to meet the target.

Calling for a recommitment to the 2% pledge, she added: “They admit that they should be able to do it and work towards it.

“The President is trying to encourage the allies to do more because the 2% is not just something that came out of the air.

“It’s what was agreed was necessary for the full capabilities of our alliance to deter and defend against any adversary – and we have some pretty powerful adversaries right now.”

In a joint declaration with NATO yesterday, the EU said it would make efforts to “strengthen NATO, and thus will improve our common security”.

It added: “For NATO allies, such efforts foster an equitable sharing of the burden, benefits and responsibilities, in full accordance with their commitment undertaken in the Defence Investment Pledge.”

The pledge, signed in 2014 at the Wales summit, called for allies which failed to meet the benchmark to stop cuts to their defence budgets, gradually raise spending, and move towards the 2% threshold within a decade.

Mirror.co.uk



Tags: