China may seek to end US military presence in Korean peninsula

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Read: 887     10:00     06 August 2018    

China is looking to increase its involvement in talks to bring about a formal end to the Korean war and may seek greater concessions from the United States after a shift in the South’s policy opened the door for a greater role for Beijing.


But the process will be complicated as Beijing may push for an end to Washington’s military deployment in the Korean peninsula, weakening its alliances in the region, according to diplomatic observers.

On the sideline of an Association of Southeast Asian Nations (Asean) summit in Singapore, Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi said a declaration to end the war could be achieved after negotiations with all involved parties, adding that this would reflect the common wish of the people in the peninsula.

He also said North Korea should stick to the “correct path” of denuclearisation, and the US should consider Pyongyang’s interests.

Senior leaders from China and North Korea have met frequently in recent months, with North Korean leader Kim Jong-un visiting China three times and officials discussing greater economic cooperation.

China’s role in the Korean peninsula appeared uncertain after the leaders of the two Koreas held a historic summit in April, when they pledged to work together to officially bring the war to an end.

While the fighting was halted by an armistice in 1953, without a formal declaration the two sides are still technically still at war.

After the meeting with South Korean President Moon Jae-in, Kim held an unprecedented summit with US President Donald Trump in June in Singapore.

Officials in South Korea said Seoul had intended to hold talks between the two Koreas and the US, and only involve China at a later stage.

South China Morning Post



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News Line

China may seek to end US military presence in Korean peninsula

2018/08/china-1020914_960_720-1533529291.png
Read: 888     10:00     06 August 2018    

China is looking to increase its involvement in talks to bring about a formal end to the Korean war and may seek greater concessions from the United States after a shift in the South’s policy opened the door for a greater role for Beijing.


But the process will be complicated as Beijing may push for an end to Washington’s military deployment in the Korean peninsula, weakening its alliances in the region, according to diplomatic observers.

On the sideline of an Association of Southeast Asian Nations (Asean) summit in Singapore, Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi said a declaration to end the war could be achieved after negotiations with all involved parties, adding that this would reflect the common wish of the people in the peninsula.

He also said North Korea should stick to the “correct path” of denuclearisation, and the US should consider Pyongyang’s interests.

Senior leaders from China and North Korea have met frequently in recent months, with North Korean leader Kim Jong-un visiting China three times and officials discussing greater economic cooperation.

China’s role in the Korean peninsula appeared uncertain after the leaders of the two Koreas held a historic summit in April, when they pledged to work together to officially bring the war to an end.

While the fighting was halted by an armistice in 1953, without a formal declaration the two sides are still technically still at war.

After the meeting with South Korean President Moon Jae-in, Kim held an unprecedented summit with US President Donald Trump in June in Singapore.

Officials in South Korea said Seoul had intended to hold talks between the two Koreas and the US, and only involve China at a later stage.

South China Morning Post



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