Azerbaijani political analyst: Armenia may set up CSTO again

2018/11/1542375096.jpg
Read: 414     17:43     16 November 2018    

The statements made in Armenia about the need to sign a military agreement between the country and the puppet separatist regime in occupied Nagorno-Karabakh region are populist in nature and are intended for internal audience, Elkhan Alasgarov, PhD, well-known Azerbaijani political analyst, head of the Expert Council of the Baku Network, told Trend.


Alasgarov was commenting on Armenia’s recent statements.

“Armenia cannot sign military treaties without the agreement with the CSTO, where it is a member,” he added.

“Yerevan is unable to draw the right conclusions from any situation and strives to make one mistake after another,” Alasgarov said. “As a CSTO member, Armenia has already made a gross mistake due to the response of CSTO Secretary General Yuri Khachaturov, thereby putting this structure in an awkward position.”

“Armenia intends to sign a military treaty supposedly aimed at ensuring the security of illegal formation in the occupied Azerbaijani territories, which is also absurd,” he added. “I believe that such statements are groundless and cast doubt on Armenia's membership in the organization. At the same time, they violate the contractual basis with all CSTO member-states."

Alasgarov stressed that all such statements are exclusively propaganda.

"To sign such a document, Armenia must leave CSTO, so all these conversations are irrelevant,” he added. “I think that even when trying to sign such a document, Armenia will face another crisis in relations with the CSTO member-states and will threaten once again authority of the Eurasian structure."

The conflict between the two South Caucasus countries began in 1988 when Armenia made territorial claims against Azerbaijan. As a result of the ensuing war, in 1992 Armenian armed forces occupied 20 percent of Azerbaijan, including the Nagorno-Karabakh region and seven surrounding districts.

The 1994 ceasefire agreement was followed by peace negotiations. Armenia has not yet implemented four UN Security Council resolutions on withdrawal of its armed forces from the Nagorno-Karabakh and the surrounding districts.

 



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Azerbaijani political analyst: Armenia may set up CSTO again

2018/11/1542375096.jpg
Read: 415     17:43     16 November 2018    

The statements made in Armenia about the need to sign a military agreement between the country and the puppet separatist regime in occupied Nagorno-Karabakh region are populist in nature and are intended for internal audience, Elkhan Alasgarov, PhD, well-known Azerbaijani political analyst, head of the Expert Council of the Baku Network, told Trend.


Alasgarov was commenting on Armenia’s recent statements.

“Armenia cannot sign military treaties without the agreement with the CSTO, where it is a member,” he added.

“Yerevan is unable to draw the right conclusions from any situation and strives to make one mistake after another,” Alasgarov said. “As a CSTO member, Armenia has already made a gross mistake due to the response of CSTO Secretary General Yuri Khachaturov, thereby putting this structure in an awkward position.”

“Armenia intends to sign a military treaty supposedly aimed at ensuring the security of illegal formation in the occupied Azerbaijani territories, which is also absurd,” he added. “I believe that such statements are groundless and cast doubt on Armenia's membership in the organization. At the same time, they violate the contractual basis with all CSTO member-states."

Alasgarov stressed that all such statements are exclusively propaganda.

"To sign such a document, Armenia must leave CSTO, so all these conversations are irrelevant,” he added. “I think that even when trying to sign such a document, Armenia will face another crisis in relations with the CSTO member-states and will threaten once again authority of the Eurasian structure."

The conflict between the two South Caucasus countries began in 1988 when Armenia made territorial claims against Azerbaijan. As a result of the ensuing war, in 1992 Armenian armed forces occupied 20 percent of Azerbaijan, including the Nagorno-Karabakh region and seven surrounding districts.

The 1994 ceasefire agreement was followed by peace negotiations. Armenia has not yet implemented four UN Security Council resolutions on withdrawal of its armed forces from the Nagorno-Karabakh and the surrounding districts.

 



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