US troops drink blood of decapitated cobras, eat spider eggs

2019/02/unnamed-1550232983.jpg
Read: 1021     16:44     15 February 2019    

U.S. military forces and other international troops from 29 different nations lined up to drink the blood of decapitated cobras during the annual Cobra Gold exercises, Asia's largest multi-national military drills in Thailand.


This weird and nauseating annual tradition is considered useful for soldiers and allegedly contains health benefits for humans who are brave enough take part in the drills.

“We do have that potential of being separated especially in jungle this thick and being able to sustain ourselves is crucial, so yes, it's very beneficial and necessary,“ a U.S. Marine identified as Sergeant Griffin said.

Participant soldiers seek out water in unlikely places, eat spider eggs, and even drink cobra blood in order to learn how to survive in an emergency situation.

The 10-day multinational military drill, which began on Wednesday, has more than 6,800 U.S. troops taking part— nearly double the country’s 2018 participation figures.

Singapore, Japan, China, India, Indonesia, Malaysia and South Korea are the active participants of this event.

The event which was first held in 1982, will last until Feb. 22, and includes disaster relief training, military field training and humanitarian assistance training.

Yeni Şafak



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News Line

US troops drink blood of decapitated cobras, eat spider eggs

2019/02/unnamed-1550232983.jpg
Read: 1022     16:44     15 February 2019    

U.S. military forces and other international troops from 29 different nations lined up to drink the blood of decapitated cobras during the annual Cobra Gold exercises, Asia's largest multi-national military drills in Thailand.


This weird and nauseating annual tradition is considered useful for soldiers and allegedly contains health benefits for humans who are brave enough take part in the drills.

“We do have that potential of being separated especially in jungle this thick and being able to sustain ourselves is crucial, so yes, it's very beneficial and necessary,“ a U.S. Marine identified as Sergeant Griffin said.

Participant soldiers seek out water in unlikely places, eat spider eggs, and even drink cobra blood in order to learn how to survive in an emergency situation.

The 10-day multinational military drill, which began on Wednesday, has more than 6,800 U.S. troops taking part— nearly double the country’s 2018 participation figures.

Singapore, Japan, China, India, Indonesia, Malaysia and South Korea are the active participants of this event.

The event which was first held in 1982, will last until Feb. 22, and includes disaster relief training, military field training and humanitarian assistance training.

Yeni Şafak



Tags: