UK arms sales to Saudi Arabia for use in Yemen declared unlawful

2019/06/3000-1561022493.jpg
Read: 647     14:08     20 June 2019    

British arms sales to Saudi Arabia that were used in Yemen have been declared unlawful by the court of appeal because they contributed to indiscriminate civilian casualties in the bombing campaign from forces led by the Gulf kingdom.


The ruling from three senior judges follows a challenge brought by Campaign Against Arms Trade, which had accused the UK government of licensing arms sales when there was a clear risk that their use could breach international humanitarian law.

The UK has licensed at least £4.7bn worth of arms to Saudi Arabia since the start of the civil war in Yemen in March 2015, with most of the recorded sales taking place before 2018.

Sales are signed off by the foreign, defence and international trade secretaries, and ministers and former ministers including the Tory leadership candidates Boris Johnson and Jeremy Hunt have defended the UK’s arms relationship with Riyadh.

Estimates say that two-thirds of the civilian deaths were caused by the Saudi-led coalition; the rest were victims of actions by the Houthi rebels they are fighting.

The Guardian



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News Line

UK arms sales to Saudi Arabia for use in Yemen declared unlawful

2019/06/3000-1561022493.jpg
Read: 648     14:08     20 June 2019    

British arms sales to Saudi Arabia that were used in Yemen have been declared unlawful by the court of appeal because they contributed to indiscriminate civilian casualties in the bombing campaign from forces led by the Gulf kingdom.


The ruling from three senior judges follows a challenge brought by Campaign Against Arms Trade, which had accused the UK government of licensing arms sales when there was a clear risk that their use could breach international humanitarian law.

The UK has licensed at least £4.7bn worth of arms to Saudi Arabia since the start of the civil war in Yemen in March 2015, with most of the recorded sales taking place before 2018.

Sales are signed off by the foreign, defence and international trade secretaries, and ministers and former ministers including the Tory leadership candidates Boris Johnson and Jeremy Hunt have defended the UK’s arms relationship with Riyadh.

Estimates say that two-thirds of the civilian deaths were caused by the Saudi-led coalition; the rest were victims of actions by the Houthi rebels they are fighting.

The Guardian



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