Two Russian bases that monitor radiation went silent in the days after 'nuclear missile blast' 

2019/08/1566214069.jpg
Read: 485     16:56     19 August 2019    

Two Russian research stations that monitor radiation levels went silent in the days after a suspected nuclear missile explosion, amid fears of a cover-up. 


Lassina Zerbo, who heads the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty Organization, revealed that the two research stations closest to the town of Arkhangelsk, where the blast occurred, went offline two days after the accident.

When contacted, the stations at Dubna and Kirov told Zerbo that they were suffering 'communication and network issues.'

But arms control experts believe the outage could be part of a Chernobyl-style operation to cover up the extent of the blast, after the Russian government at first refused to reveal the explosion had come from a nuclear source. 

Daryl Kimball, executive director of the Arms Control Association, told the Wall Street Journal: 'It is a very odd coincidence that these stations stopped sending data shortly after the August 8 incident.

'It is probably because they want to obscure the technical details of the missile-propulsion system they are trying and failing to develop.'

Initial reports from Russia's nuclear watchdog said five workers had died and three were injured after a rocket engine explosion. 

But after reports emerged that showed radiation levels in the area had increased by up to 16 times following the blast, the Kremlin qualified, saying the blast had involved a 'nuclear isotope power source.'

The government has refused to reveal any further details since then. 

On Sunday, it emerged that as many as 60 medics at the hospital treating injured workers from the blast have been flown to Moscow for urgent medical tests after they were not told of radiation risks when survivors were brought in.

One doctor was later found to have Caesium-137 — a radioactive isotope that is a byproduct of the nuclear fission of uranium-235 — in his muscle tissue.

The medic 'was not informed about the amount or concentration of the isotope found', reported The Moscow Times.

Three victims arrived naked and wrapped in translucent plastic bags on the day of the explosion - 8 August - but at no point were medics at Arkhangelsk Regional Clinical Hospital told how the men had become injured except that it involved an explosion, it was claimed.

One day later all medical records from the incident were deleted by Russian secret services agents who visited to hospital.

Two of these three victims treated at the hospital later died en route to the airport to be transported to Moscow.

The incident is compared by one doctor to a shocking scene from the HBO mini-series 'Chernobyl' when doctors are depicted treating victims without protective gear.

In the drama, a nurse explains that their clothes should be burned, but the medics still handle toxic items with their bare hands.

Daily Mail



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News Line

Two Russian bases that monitor radiation went silent in the days after 'nuclear missile blast' 

2019/08/1566214069.jpg
Read: 486     16:56     19 August 2019    

Two Russian research stations that monitor radiation levels went silent in the days after a suspected nuclear missile explosion, amid fears of a cover-up. 


Lassina Zerbo, who heads the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty Organization, revealed that the two research stations closest to the town of Arkhangelsk, where the blast occurred, went offline two days after the accident.

When contacted, the stations at Dubna and Kirov told Zerbo that they were suffering 'communication and network issues.'

But arms control experts believe the outage could be part of a Chernobyl-style operation to cover up the extent of the blast, after the Russian government at first refused to reveal the explosion had come from a nuclear source. 

Daryl Kimball, executive director of the Arms Control Association, told the Wall Street Journal: 'It is a very odd coincidence that these stations stopped sending data shortly after the August 8 incident.

'It is probably because they want to obscure the technical details of the missile-propulsion system they are trying and failing to develop.'

Initial reports from Russia's nuclear watchdog said five workers had died and three were injured after a rocket engine explosion. 

But after reports emerged that showed radiation levels in the area had increased by up to 16 times following the blast, the Kremlin qualified, saying the blast had involved a 'nuclear isotope power source.'

The government has refused to reveal any further details since then. 

On Sunday, it emerged that as many as 60 medics at the hospital treating injured workers from the blast have been flown to Moscow for urgent medical tests after they were not told of radiation risks when survivors were brought in.

One doctor was later found to have Caesium-137 — a radioactive isotope that is a byproduct of the nuclear fission of uranium-235 — in his muscle tissue.

The medic 'was not informed about the amount or concentration of the isotope found', reported The Moscow Times.

Three victims arrived naked and wrapped in translucent plastic bags on the day of the explosion - 8 August - but at no point were medics at Arkhangelsk Regional Clinical Hospital told how the men had become injured except that it involved an explosion, it was claimed.

One day later all medical records from the incident were deleted by Russian secret services agents who visited to hospital.

Two of these three victims treated at the hospital later died en route to the airport to be transported to Moscow.

The incident is compared by one doctor to a shocking scene from the HBO mini-series 'Chernobyl' when doctors are depicted treating victims without protective gear.

In the drama, a nurse explains that their clothes should be burned, but the medics still handle toxic items with their bare hands.

Daily Mail



Tags: