South Korea axes pact to share military intelligence with Japan

2019/08/2019-08-20T092427Z_1569721595_RC1C52083AA0_RTRMADP_3_SOUTHKOREA-JAPAN-LABOURERS-CHINA-1024x661-1566469015.jpg
Read: 611     14:56     22 August 2019    

South Korea scrapped an agreement to share military intelligence with Japan on Thursday, dramatically escalating the stakes in the U.S. allies’ dispute over trade and historical grievances. 


The decision is sure to be met with concern in the United States, which views intelligence sharing between the allies over North Korea as critical.

Kim You-geun of the National Security Council in Seoul said Japan’s decision to drop South Korea from a list of trusted trading partners earlier this month, citing security issues, “caused a grave change to the security cooperation between the two countries.” 

“Given such circumstances, our government has decided that maintaining this agreement set for the sake of exchanging sensitive military information does not fit our national interest,” Kim told a news conference.

The pact, known as the General Security of Military Information Agreement, was signed in 2016 in the face of a growing threat from North Korea’s nuclear-weapons program. 

The decision comes just a day after the foreign ministers from both countries met at a trilateral event in China, where they agreed to keep talking but failed to announce any progress at resolving their differences.

The United States had urged the two allies to settle their differences, with Secretary of State Mike Pompeo stressing “incredibly important” cooperation on North Korea. 

A Japanese official called Seoul’s decision “extremely regrettable,” Japan’s Kyodo news agency reported.



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South Korea axes pact to share military intelligence with Japan

2019/08/2019-08-20T092427Z_1569721595_RC1C52083AA0_RTRMADP_3_SOUTHKOREA-JAPAN-LABOURERS-CHINA-1024x661-1566469015.jpg
Read: 612     14:56     22 August 2019    

South Korea scrapped an agreement to share military intelligence with Japan on Thursday, dramatically escalating the stakes in the U.S. allies’ dispute over trade and historical grievances. 


The decision is sure to be met with concern in the United States, which views intelligence sharing between the allies over North Korea as critical.

Kim You-geun of the National Security Council in Seoul said Japan’s decision to drop South Korea from a list of trusted trading partners earlier this month, citing security issues, “caused a grave change to the security cooperation between the two countries.” 

“Given such circumstances, our government has decided that maintaining this agreement set for the sake of exchanging sensitive military information does not fit our national interest,” Kim told a news conference.

The pact, known as the General Security of Military Information Agreement, was signed in 2016 in the face of a growing threat from North Korea’s nuclear-weapons program. 

The decision comes just a day after the foreign ministers from both countries met at a trilateral event in China, where they agreed to keep talking but failed to announce any progress at resolving their differences.

The United States had urged the two allies to settle their differences, with Secretary of State Mike Pompeo stressing “incredibly important” cooperation on North Korea. 

A Japanese official called Seoul’s decision “extremely regrettable,” Japan’s Kyodo news agency reported.



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