Pentagon slams South Korean president for ending intel-sharing agreement with Japan

2019/08/aptopix_trump_us_north_korea_55460_c0-179-4285-2677_s885x516-1566509530.jpg
Read: 473     10:26     23 August 2019    

The Pentagon sharply criticized the government of South Korea President Moon Jae-in on Thursday for cancelling a key intelligence-sharing pact with Japanamid a bitter trade dispute between the two U.S. allies.


“The Department of Defense expresses our strong concern and disappointment that the Moon administration has withheld its renewal of the [pact],” Pentagon spokesman Lt. Col. Dave Eastburn said in a statement underscoring sensitivity of the development at moment when the Trump administration seeks unity between Seoul and Tokyo behind U.S. policies toward China and North Korea.

The surprise collapse of the intelligence sharing pact is likely to set back U.S. efforts to bolster delicate security cooperation with South Korea and Japan. Lt. Col. Eastburn’s statement suggested U.S. officials are wary about the impact on military-to-military communications between Washington, Tokyo and Seoul.

“We strongly believe that the integrity of our mutual defense and security ties must persist despite frictions in other areas of the ROK-Japan relationship,” the statement said. “We’ll continue to pursue bilateral and trilateral defense and security cooperation where possible with Japan and [South Korea].”

South Korean ties with Japan are widely seen to be at their lowest point since the two countries established diplomatic relations in 1965. Japan colonized the Korean Peninsula from 1910 to 1945.

The Associated Press reported Thursday that many experts had predicted South Korea was unlikely to spike the 3-year-old intelligence-sharing deal for the sake of its relations with the United States. South Korea has been seeking U.S. help in resolving the trade dispute with Japan, and Seoul and Washington have also been working together to restart stalled talks on stripping North Korea of its nuclear weapons.

The Associated Press



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Pentagon slams South Korean president for ending intel-sharing agreement with Japan

2019/08/aptopix_trump_us_north_korea_55460_c0-179-4285-2677_s885x516-1566509530.jpg
Read: 474     10:26     23 August 2019    

The Pentagon sharply criticized the government of South Korea President Moon Jae-in on Thursday for cancelling a key intelligence-sharing pact with Japanamid a bitter trade dispute between the two U.S. allies.


“The Department of Defense expresses our strong concern and disappointment that the Moon administration has withheld its renewal of the [pact],” Pentagon spokesman Lt. Col. Dave Eastburn said in a statement underscoring sensitivity of the development at moment when the Trump administration seeks unity between Seoul and Tokyo behind U.S. policies toward China and North Korea.

The surprise collapse of the intelligence sharing pact is likely to set back U.S. efforts to bolster delicate security cooperation with South Korea and Japan. Lt. Col. Eastburn’s statement suggested U.S. officials are wary about the impact on military-to-military communications between Washington, Tokyo and Seoul.

“We strongly believe that the integrity of our mutual defense and security ties must persist despite frictions in other areas of the ROK-Japan relationship,” the statement said. “We’ll continue to pursue bilateral and trilateral defense and security cooperation where possible with Japan and [South Korea].”

South Korean ties with Japan are widely seen to be at their lowest point since the two countries established diplomatic relations in 1965. Japan colonized the Korean Peninsula from 1910 to 1945.

The Associated Press reported Thursday that many experts had predicted South Korea was unlikely to spike the 3-year-old intelligence-sharing deal for the sake of its relations with the United States. South Korea has been seeking U.S. help in resolving the trade dispute with Japan, and Seoul and Washington have also been working together to restart stalled talks on stripping North Korea of its nuclear weapons.

The Associated Press



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