Future Tanks Could Be Powered by Electricity

2019/09/1568785540.jpg
Read: 783     12:07     18 September 2019    

By Kyle Mizokami

Main battle tanks and other armored vehicles of the future could run on electricity or utilize a hybrid drive system. Switching to such a system could not only reduce the demand for liquid fuel on the battlefield, but also avoid risking the lives of truck-driving soldiers delivering fuel to the front lines.


Traditional armored vehicles, including tanks, use engines running on diesel or gasoline. The need to drive a 60-ton vehicle cross-country, as well as provide power to fire control, sensors, and environmental systems, requires powerful engines. Tanks must also be able to accelerate quickly and, in a pinch, have the spare horsepower to tow other tanks. Ideally an armored vehicle should have a horsepower-to-weight ratio exceeding 20 to 1, which leads to engines capable of generating up to 1,500 horsepower.

These engines require a huge amount of fuel. A U.S. Army armored division with all armored vehicles on-line and on the move can consume up to 500,000 gallons of fuel a day. All that fuel has to come from somewhere, typically the continental U.S., and is then driven in trucks to rearming and refueling points just behind the front line. Complicating matters, the M1A2 Abrams tank uses gasoline, while the M2 Bradley infantry fighting vehicle, M109 Paladin howitzer, and other vehicles use diesel.

popularmechanics



Tags:



News Line

Future Tanks Could Be Powered by Electricity

2019/09/1568785540.jpg
Read: 784     12:07     18 September 2019    

By Kyle Mizokami

Main battle tanks and other armored vehicles of the future could run on electricity or utilize a hybrid drive system. Switching to such a system could not only reduce the demand for liquid fuel on the battlefield, but also avoid risking the lives of truck-driving soldiers delivering fuel to the front lines.


Traditional armored vehicles, including tanks, use engines running on diesel or gasoline. The need to drive a 60-ton vehicle cross-country, as well as provide power to fire control, sensors, and environmental systems, requires powerful engines. Tanks must also be able to accelerate quickly and, in a pinch, have the spare horsepower to tow other tanks. Ideally an armored vehicle should have a horsepower-to-weight ratio exceeding 20 to 1, which leads to engines capable of generating up to 1,500 horsepower.

These engines require a huge amount of fuel. A U.S. Army armored division with all armored vehicles on-line and on the move can consume up to 500,000 gallons of fuel a day. All that fuel has to come from somewhere, typically the continental U.S., and is then driven in trucks to rearming and refueling points just behind the front line. Complicating matters, the M1A2 Abrams tank uses gasoline, while the M2 Bradley infantry fighting vehicle, M109 Paladin howitzer, and other vehicles use diesel.

popularmechanics



Tags: