South Korean K136 Kooryong MLRS Multiple Launch Rocket Systems will be delivered to Philippines

2019/12/1575665452.jpg
Read: 2340     11:07     07 December 2019    

According to a tweet released by Frances Mangosing, the Philippine Armed Forces army will soon receive K136 Kooryong MLRS Multiple Launch Rocket Systems from South Korea, a mockup of the vehicle was displayed during the Philippine Army defence expo 2019.


According to a news released by the Philippine News Agency on August 14, 2019, the multiple launch rocket system (MLRS) acquired from South Korea will be entered in services with the Philippine army.

The K136 Kooryong is a South Korean rocket artillery system that was deployed in 1986. A total of 150 of these multiple launch rocket systems were built and are currently in service with the South Korean Army.

The K136 Kooryong is equipped with a pod of 36 launch tubes arranged in a rectangular shape that can be turned away from the unprotected cab. The rocket tube arrangement is a single rectangular bank of four layers each with 9 tubes. It can fire two types of rockets, the standard K30 and K33 extended range rocket. The standard rocket is 2.4 m long and weights 54 kg. The K33 is 2.53 m long and weighs 64 kg. The K30 has a maximum range of 23 km, while the K33 has a maximum range of 36 km. The rockets can be equipped with two types of warheads including the conventional HE and pre fragmented HE, containing 16 000 steel balls.

The rocket launcher pod is mounted on KM809A1 6x6 truck chassis powered by a diesel engine, developing 236 horsepower. The vehicle has a full-time all-wheel drive and is fitted with a central tire pressure system. It can run at a maximum road speed of 80 km/h with a maximum cruising range of 550 km.

This K136 Kooryong MLRS is reloaded manually in about 10 minutes. Reloading usually takes place away from the launch position to avoid counter-battery fire. Reload rockets are carried by escorting KM813A1 6x6 resupply truck, which carries 72 rockets.

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South Korean K136 Kooryong MLRS Multiple Launch Rocket Systems will be delivered to Philippines

2019/12/1575665452.jpg
Read: 2341     11:07     07 December 2019    

According to a tweet released by Frances Mangosing, the Philippine Armed Forces army will soon receive K136 Kooryong MLRS Multiple Launch Rocket Systems from South Korea, a mockup of the vehicle was displayed during the Philippine Army defence expo 2019.


According to a news released by the Philippine News Agency on August 14, 2019, the multiple launch rocket system (MLRS) acquired from South Korea will be entered in services with the Philippine army.

The K136 Kooryong is a South Korean rocket artillery system that was deployed in 1986. A total of 150 of these multiple launch rocket systems were built and are currently in service with the South Korean Army.

The K136 Kooryong is equipped with a pod of 36 launch tubes arranged in a rectangular shape that can be turned away from the unprotected cab. The rocket tube arrangement is a single rectangular bank of four layers each with 9 tubes. It can fire two types of rockets, the standard K30 and K33 extended range rocket. The standard rocket is 2.4 m long and weights 54 kg. The K33 is 2.53 m long and weighs 64 kg. The K30 has a maximum range of 23 km, while the K33 has a maximum range of 36 km. The rockets can be equipped with two types of warheads including the conventional HE and pre fragmented HE, containing 16 000 steel balls.

The rocket launcher pod is mounted on KM809A1 6x6 truck chassis powered by a diesel engine, developing 236 horsepower. The vehicle has a full-time all-wheel drive and is fitted with a central tire pressure system. It can run at a maximum road speed of 80 km/h with a maximum cruising range of 550 km.

This K136 Kooryong MLRS is reloaded manually in about 10 minutes. Reloading usually takes place away from the launch position to avoid counter-battery fire. Reload rockets are carried by escorting KM813A1 6x6 resupply truck, which carries 72 rockets.

Army Recognition



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