Turkey expects NATO to use its power to provide peace in Syria

2020/03/1585028902.jpg
Read: 903     10:27     24 March 2020    

Being a member of the organization for almost 70 years, Turkey expects NATO to be more effective in Syria in order to ensure security in the war-torn country.


"NATO should have used its power to provide peace and establish safe zones in Syria and Idlib," said Hakan Çavuşoğlu, Parliament's Human Rights Commission head, adding that instead, the organization has focused on stopping migrants from crossing to Europe.

Speaking to Anadolu Agency (AA) on Monday, Çavuşoğlu criticized the organization's stance toward recent regional developments while underlining that Turkey has been left alone both in handling the refugee burden and establishing stability in northern Syria.

He highlighted the still ongoing threat of a new flow of 3.5 million refugees displaced in Idlib due to Syrian regime attacks and underlined that it is not possible for Turkey to take take care of this problem alone.

"Turkey offered to establish a safe zone in Syria that is also a no-fly zone for refugees, and yet no one took the responsibility and made an initiative to do so," Çavuşoğlu expressed, referring to NATO countries' indifferent attitude throughout the process.

Joining the organization back in 1952, Turkey saw NATO membership as something that would make a positive contribution to the country's economic, military and political development. Since then, Turkey has been a vital ally, providing NATO a connection to the East and control of Turkey's straits.sor

Turkey has been criticizing NATO for its failure in recognizing the country's legitimate security concerns and acting as a proper ally.

Recently, tensions between Ankara and NATO heightened after Turkey launched an operation in Syria to secure its borders from terrorist elements. Turkey launched Operation Peace Spring on Oct. 9 to eliminate all terrorist groups from northeastern Syria and create a safe zone along the border, paving the way for the voluntary return of Syrian refugees.

Several NATO members, including the U.S., France and Germany, criticized the operation, expressing concerns over a potential humanitarian crisis and wider instability in the region, ignoring Turkey's needs for support for its security.

Idlib falls within a de-escalation zone laid out in a deal between Turkey and Russia in late 2018. The Syrian regime and its allies, however, have consistently broken the terms of the cease-fire, launching frequent attacks inside the zone.

After the Syrian civil war broke out in 2011, Turkey adopted an “open-door policy” toward Syrians fleeing the conflict, granting them “temporary protection” status. Since then, Turkey has received a constant flow of displaced Syrians fleeing the conflict and their numbers have expanded from mere thousands to millions.

In this process, Turkish officials have put forward humanitarian efforts to meet the basic needs of refugees by offering them various forms of assistance and helping coordinate international aid. Modern camps provide refugees access to all basic services, from education to vocational training courses. Compared to refugee camps in many Western countries, Turkey maintains much better standards despite hosting much larger populations.

Daily Sabah



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Turkey expects NATO to use its power to provide peace in Syria

2020/03/1585028902.jpg
Read: 904     10:27     24 March 2020    

Being a member of the organization for almost 70 years, Turkey expects NATO to be more effective in Syria in order to ensure security in the war-torn country.


"NATO should have used its power to provide peace and establish safe zones in Syria and Idlib," said Hakan Çavuşoğlu, Parliament's Human Rights Commission head, adding that instead, the organization has focused on stopping migrants from crossing to Europe.

Speaking to Anadolu Agency (AA) on Monday, Çavuşoğlu criticized the organization's stance toward recent regional developments while underlining that Turkey has been left alone both in handling the refugee burden and establishing stability in northern Syria.

He highlighted the still ongoing threat of a new flow of 3.5 million refugees displaced in Idlib due to Syrian regime attacks and underlined that it is not possible for Turkey to take take care of this problem alone.

"Turkey offered to establish a safe zone in Syria that is also a no-fly zone for refugees, and yet no one took the responsibility and made an initiative to do so," Çavuşoğlu expressed, referring to NATO countries' indifferent attitude throughout the process.

Joining the organization back in 1952, Turkey saw NATO membership as something that would make a positive contribution to the country's economic, military and political development. Since then, Turkey has been a vital ally, providing NATO a connection to the East and control of Turkey's straits.sor

Turkey has been criticizing NATO for its failure in recognizing the country's legitimate security concerns and acting as a proper ally.

Recently, tensions between Ankara and NATO heightened after Turkey launched an operation in Syria to secure its borders from terrorist elements. Turkey launched Operation Peace Spring on Oct. 9 to eliminate all terrorist groups from northeastern Syria and create a safe zone along the border, paving the way for the voluntary return of Syrian refugees.

Several NATO members, including the U.S., France and Germany, criticized the operation, expressing concerns over a potential humanitarian crisis and wider instability in the region, ignoring Turkey's needs for support for its security.

Idlib falls within a de-escalation zone laid out in a deal between Turkey and Russia in late 2018. The Syrian regime and its allies, however, have consistently broken the terms of the cease-fire, launching frequent attacks inside the zone.

After the Syrian civil war broke out in 2011, Turkey adopted an “open-door policy” toward Syrians fleeing the conflict, granting them “temporary protection” status. Since then, Turkey has received a constant flow of displaced Syrians fleeing the conflict and their numbers have expanded from mere thousands to millions.

In this process, Turkish officials have put forward humanitarian efforts to meet the basic needs of refugees by offering them various forms of assistance and helping coordinate international aid. Modern camps provide refugees access to all basic services, from education to vocational training courses. Compared to refugee camps in many Western countries, Turkey maintains much better standards despite hosting much larger populations.

Daily Sabah



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