S. Korea to build defence system against N. Korea’s long-range artillery

2020/08/1597133442.jpg
Read: 736     12:24     11 August 2020    

A “Korean Iron Dome” system designed to shield Seoul against North Korea’s long-range artillery is to be built around 2030, according to local media.


An exclusive global positional system (GPS) for the South Korean military is also being pursued to be established by the early to mid-2030s.

On Aug. 10, the South Korean Ministry of National Defense (MND) released its “Intermediate-Term National Defense Plan, 2021-2025,” which includes plans for military power development and management over the next five years. According to the MND’s announcement, authorities plan to begin development in the next five years on the “Korean Iron Dome,” an interception system capable of defending the Seoul Capital Area (SCA) and key facilities from the threat of North Korea’s long-range artillery.

The category of long-range artillery, which includes North Korean multiple-launch rocket systems and 170mm self-propelled artillery, drew attention as a key form of conventional firepower at the time of North Korea’s threats to turn Seoul into a “sea of fire.” While the military has worked to establish a Korean Air and Missile Defense (KAMD) system, it is designed to intercept ballistic missiles such as the Scud and is ineffective against long-range artillery.

In a recent report, the US-based Rand Corporation predicted that a surprise attack by North Korea using conventional artillery alone could result in over 130,000 casualties in Seoul within one hour. An MND official explained, “The long-range artillery interception system could be force-integrated by the late 2020s to early 2030s.”

Another project involves the establishment of an independent South Korean GPS that can be used in conjunction with US GPS, with a target date of force integration by the early to mid-2030s. The South Korean military is expected to gain expanded independent tactical capability once it has its own GPS. An additional plan involves launching an ultra-small reconnaissance satellite capable of detecting terrestrial objects at sizes as small as 1m high by the mid-2020s through the use of solid fuel launch vehicles, which recently became possible through an amendment of South Korea-US missile guidelines.



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S. Korea to build defence system against N. Korea’s long-range artillery

2020/08/1597133442.jpg
Read: 737     12:24     11 August 2020    

A “Korean Iron Dome” system designed to shield Seoul against North Korea’s long-range artillery is to be built around 2030, according to local media.


An exclusive global positional system (GPS) for the South Korean military is also being pursued to be established by the early to mid-2030s.

On Aug. 10, the South Korean Ministry of National Defense (MND) released its “Intermediate-Term National Defense Plan, 2021-2025,” which includes plans for military power development and management over the next five years. According to the MND’s announcement, authorities plan to begin development in the next five years on the “Korean Iron Dome,” an interception system capable of defending the Seoul Capital Area (SCA) and key facilities from the threat of North Korea’s long-range artillery.

The category of long-range artillery, which includes North Korean multiple-launch rocket systems and 170mm self-propelled artillery, drew attention as a key form of conventional firepower at the time of North Korea’s threats to turn Seoul into a “sea of fire.” While the military has worked to establish a Korean Air and Missile Defense (KAMD) system, it is designed to intercept ballistic missiles such as the Scud and is ineffective against long-range artillery.

In a recent report, the US-based Rand Corporation predicted that a surprise attack by North Korea using conventional artillery alone could result in over 130,000 casualties in Seoul within one hour. An MND official explained, “The long-range artillery interception system could be force-integrated by the late 2020s to early 2030s.”

Another project involves the establishment of an independent South Korean GPS that can be used in conjunction with US GPS, with a target date of force integration by the early to mid-2030s. The South Korean military is expected to gain expanded independent tactical capability once it has its own GPS. An additional plan involves launching an ultra-small reconnaissance satellite capable of detecting terrestrial objects at sizes as small as 1m high by the mid-2020s through the use of solid fuel launch vehicles, which recently became possible through an amendment of South Korea-US missile guidelines.



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