German army MARS II MLRS-E improved Multiple Launch Rocket System artillery sniper weapon

2021/06/1624009432.jpg
Read: 404     15:18     18 June 2021    

German army continues to use the American M270 MLRS, Multiple Launch Rocket System that entered in service with the U.S. Army in 1983. The German version has now been upgraded to the standard MARS II/MLRS-E able to fire guided rockets. The M270 is also in service with Egypt, Bahrain, Finland, France, Greece, Israel, Italy, Japan, Saudi Arabia, South Korea, Turkey, and the UK.


The M270 MLRS (Multiple Launch Rocket System) is in service with the German army since 1990 under the name of MARS (Medium Artillery Rocket System). The vehicle is based on a stretched version of the American Bradley tracked armored IFV (Infantry Fighting Vehicle). The vehicle design consists of a crew cab located at the front of the chassis and the launcher unit mounted at the rear of the tracked chassis It contains the computerized fire-control system, a stabilization reference package/position determining system, a launcher drive system, and a twin-boom crane unit for self-loading and unloading.

The original launcher unit of the M270 is fitted with two pods of six launcher tubes able to fire unguided 230 mm rockets in approx. 60 seconds. In November 1998, American company Lockheed Martin Missiles and Fire Control was awarded a contract for the development of the Guided MLRS (GMLRS) rocket. The GMLRS was an international cooperative program with France, Germany, Italy, the UK, and the US who worked together throughout the EMD phase of the rocket's life cycle. The GMLRS rocket includes an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) aided by a Global Positioning System (GPS) integrated on a GMLRS rocket body. The MARS II of the German army is now equipped with a new European Fire Control System (EFC) enabling the firing of guided missiles GMLRS. It can also fire M31 GMLRS, M31A1, M32, AT2 and 110 mm rockets, but not of M26, M26A1, and M30, so as to ensure full compliance with the Convention on Cluster Munitions.

The MARS II/MLRS-E has a crew of three including the driver, commander and gunner which are seated in the fully enclosed cab at the front of the vehicle offering protection against the firing of small arms and artillery shell fragments by aluminum armor and louvered windows. All the firing operations can be performed from inside of the crew cabin which is fitted with an overpressure ventilation system to prevent rocket fumes from entering the cab. Equipment capabilities permit a reduced crew, or even one person, to accomplish a complete fire mission including the loading and unloading operations.

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German army MARS II MLRS-E improved Multiple Launch Rocket System artillery sniper weapon

2021/06/1624009432.jpg
Read: 405     15:18     18 June 2021    

German army continues to use the American M270 MLRS, Multiple Launch Rocket System that entered in service with the U.S. Army in 1983. The German version has now been upgraded to the standard MARS II/MLRS-E able to fire guided rockets. The M270 is also in service with Egypt, Bahrain, Finland, France, Greece, Israel, Italy, Japan, Saudi Arabia, South Korea, Turkey, and the UK.


The M270 MLRS (Multiple Launch Rocket System) is in service with the German army since 1990 under the name of MARS (Medium Artillery Rocket System). The vehicle is based on a stretched version of the American Bradley tracked armored IFV (Infantry Fighting Vehicle). The vehicle design consists of a crew cab located at the front of the chassis and the launcher unit mounted at the rear of the tracked chassis It contains the computerized fire-control system, a stabilization reference package/position determining system, a launcher drive system, and a twin-boom crane unit for self-loading and unloading.

The original launcher unit of the M270 is fitted with two pods of six launcher tubes able to fire unguided 230 mm rockets in approx. 60 seconds. In November 1998, American company Lockheed Martin Missiles and Fire Control was awarded a contract for the development of the Guided MLRS (GMLRS) rocket. The GMLRS was an international cooperative program with France, Germany, Italy, the UK, and the US who worked together throughout the EMD phase of the rocket's life cycle. The GMLRS rocket includes an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) aided by a Global Positioning System (GPS) integrated on a GMLRS rocket body. The MARS II of the German army is now equipped with a new European Fire Control System (EFC) enabling the firing of guided missiles GMLRS. It can also fire M31 GMLRS, M31A1, M32, AT2 and 110 mm rockets, but not of M26, M26A1, and M30, so as to ensure full compliance with the Convention on Cluster Munitions.

The MARS II/MLRS-E has a crew of three including the driver, commander and gunner which are seated in the fully enclosed cab at the front of the vehicle offering protection against the firing of small arms and artillery shell fragments by aluminum armor and louvered windows. All the firing operations can be performed from inside of the crew cabin which is fitted with an overpressure ventilation system to prevent rocket fumes from entering the cab. Equipment capabilities permit a reduced crew, or even one person, to accomplish a complete fire mission including the loading and unloading operations.

Army Recognition



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